Health and Wellness

Understanding Chronic Pain

There are two types of pain: acute and chronic. Acute pain is a type of pain that tells someone when their body may be injured. It normally goes away as the body heals and doesn't last too long. Chronic pain is a type of pain that normally last for more than 12 weeks. It can originally come from:

• an injury, such as a sprained back or a serious infection
• arthritis-inflammation or swelling of joints
• headaches and migraines
• cancer

Sometimes, there is not a clear reason for the pain. Chronic pain can keep a person from carrying out their everyday activities because of their limited movements, flexibility, and strength.

Read More >

You Can Quit Smoking

Call the Michigan Tobacco Quitline

Hours: 24 hours a day
-Callers can leave a message for a return call within 2 business days
The Quit Line's Free Services Include:
1. Information and referrals to local quit-tobacco resources and services.
2. Text messaged or emailed tips for quitting.
3. Information for those concerned about a tobacco user.
4. Telephone coaching for Michigan residents with Medicare, Medicaid, County Health Insurance Plans, Veterans Insurance or who are uninsured.
o Enrollees will receive personalized advice on how to quit, information on medications,
and assistance with choosing a quit date and creating a quit plan.
o Enrollees receive four coaching calls during their quit attempt. They can also contact
the Quitline between calls as needed.
5. Eight weeks of free medication (nicotine patch, gum or lozenge) for qualified enrollees.

How to Reach Us:
1. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW, 1-800-784-8669 or 1-855-DEJELO-YA , 1-855-335-3569
2. Services are also available in Arabic by calling 1-800-784-8669
3. Callers wishing to speak with an American Indian Coach may call 1-855-372-0037
4. Visit https://michigan.quitlogix.org/enrollment/default.aspx and click on Enroll Now. A Quitline coach will call you shortly.

Helping Smokers Quit:
Over 100,000 callers since October 2003.

Understanding Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which a person’s blood glucose (blood sugar) is too high. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into a type of sugar called glucose, which is the main source of energy for your body. In your body, there is an organ called the pancreas that makes insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps move glucose from your blood into the cells of your body for the use of energy. People with diabetes have high level of blood glucose or sugar because their pancreas is not making enough insulin for their bodies or their blood cells have trouble using insulin. Since there is not enough glucose moving into your cells, it builds up in the blood and causes your overall blood glucose/sugar level to rise.

Read more >

Preventive Care for Health Living

While your doctor or primary care provider is able to treat you when you are sick, they can also help you take steps to staying healthy and lowering your risk for heart disease, cancer, stroke, and other serious diseases. Depending on your age, medical history, and family history, there are certain steps you can take to stay healthy.
1. Go to your regular doctor or provider for screenings or tests that are used to check your overall health or the health of different parts of your body.
2. Measurements of weight and blood pressure are used by your doctor or provider to talk about your diet and exercise.
3. Talking with your doctor or provider about your use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs and asking about ways to lessen stress and chances of accidents can improve your daily health.
4. Immunizations or vaccine shots for both children and adults are also important to prevent getting sick.

Read more >

Is Quitting Smoking on Your Calendar for 2015?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Every January 1, people all over the world make New Year's resolutions. If you're one of the nearly 7 out of 10 current U.S. smokers who want to quit, why not get started today? Smoking is still the number one cause of preventable death and disease in the United States. Quitting now can cut your risk for diseases caused by smoking and leave you feeling stronger and healthier.

Learn how to quit today >

Simple Tips for Healthy Eyes

Your eyes are an important part of your health. You can do many things to keep them healthy and make sure you’re seeing your best. Follow these simple guidelines for maintaining healthy eyes well into your golden years.

Read more >

Eight Dimensions of Wellness

For people with mental health and substance use conditions, wellness is not the absence of disease, illness or stress, but the presence of purpose in life, active involvement in satisfying work and play, joyful relationships, a healthy body and living environment, and happiness. That’s why the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Adminstration's Wellness Initiative encourages you to incorporate the Eight Dimensions of Wellness in your life.

Read more >

Michigan Tobacco Quitline

The Quitline's Free Services Include

  • Information and referrals to local quit-tobacco resources and services
  • Information for those concerned about a tobacco user
  • Telephone coaching for Michigan residents with Medicare, Medicaid, County Health Insurance Plans, Veterans Insurance or who are uninsured.
    • Enrollees will receive personalized advice on how to quit, information on medications, and assistance with choosing a quit date and creating a quit plan.
    • Enrollees will receive four coaching calls during their quit attempt. They can also contact the Quitline between calls as needed.
  • Eight weeks of free medication (nicotine patch, gum or lozenge) for qualified enrollees.

Read more >

Who Should Get the Flu Shot

Everyone older than 6 months is recommended for flu vaccination with rare exception. The following lists include all people recommended to get the flu vaccine, those who are not recommended to receive either the flu shot or the nasal spray vaccine, and those who should take certain precautions before getting vaccinated. Talk to your doctor or nurse if you have any questions regarding which flu vaccine options are best for you and your family.

Read more >

Reducing Drug Use, One Community at a Time

CADCA (Community Anti Drug Coalitions of America), the national training and advocacy organization for the community coalition model, speaks to the role of communities as follows.

Read more >

Integrated Health Care Works

Integrated care produces the best outcomes and is the most effective approach to caring for people with complex healthcare needs.

Read more >